Hydropower Appreciation Day

Hydropower Appreciation Day

by Mason PUD 3 on

December 14, 2016

It's a county-wide celebration of clean, renewable, energy!

PUDs in Mason County deliver about 97% CARBON-FREE electricity, which is made up primarily of hydropower, which produces no emissions. 

The Seahawks Action Green Color Rush uniforms will be debuted on Thursday Night Football, tonight, December 15. As far as we can tell, they're also 97% GREEN!

Let's join the MLS Champion, Sounders, in celebrating being GREEN! #ThisMoment

Mason County electricity customers get about 87 percent of their electricity from federal hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. You could say we've 86-ed Carbon!

Dams in the Columbia River Basin produce more electricity than any other North American river and account for 40 percent of all US hydropower.

Hydropower output can act as a battery and be quickly used as an excellent back-up for intermittent wind or solar energy.

The hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin work together to ensure efficient use of the renewable resource to maximize the flow of the river.

Traditional industries and businesses, representing hundreds of thousands of jobs, continue to rely on low-cost hydro to stay in business and prosper.

Barging of 42 million tons of cargo, valued at over $20 billion, on the “marine highway” created by Columbia and Snake River dams is the most environmentally friendly way to move cargo. It keeps 700,000 trucks off the region’s highways every year.

The annual net earned income from Pacific Northwest agriculture exceeds $8 billion. The region’s economy is greatly enhanced by 7.8 million acres of irrigated agricultural land that without hydropower and reservoirs, would otherwise be too dry to farm successfully.

About one-third of our power rates go towards salmon restoration efforts. Over the last several years, Pacific Northwest Public Utilities, and their customers, invested nearly ONE BILLION DOLLARS into fish and wildlife programs.

There are more fish in the Columbia River now than at any time since 1938, when the first dam was built at Bonneville.

In 2015, over 2.3 MILLION adult salmon passed Bonneville Dam, the second-strongest return since counts began in 1938.

Young salmon make the downstream trip through the federal dams with an incredible 97% survival rate!

Mason PUD 1, Mason PUD 3, and Mason County are celebrating the many benefits of hydroelectric power here in the Pacific Northwest on Thursday, December 15.

Click through the slide show above and watch the video below to learn more about all of the benefits of hydropower- THE BEST DAM POWER!

Preserving the Habitat of Johns Creek Chum Salmon in Mason County:

Quick Facts on Why Hydropower Should Be Celebrated:

  • Mason County electricity customers get about 87 percent of their electricity from federal hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin.

  • Hydroelectricity is the Pacific Northwest’s premier clean, renewable, and reliable resource, providing nearly 60 percent of the Northwest’s electricity and 90 percent of its renewable energy.

  • Dams in the Columbia River Basin produce more electricity than any other North American river and account for 40 percent of all U-S hydropower.

  • Hydropower output can be quickly used as an excellent back-up for intermittent wind or solar energy.

  • High technology firms have located facilities in the Pacific Northwest because of the availability of reliable, clean hydropower, creating jobs and boosting local economies;

  • Traditional industries and businesses, representing hundreds of thousands of jobs, continue to rely on low-cost hydro to stay in business and prosper;

  • Barging of 42 million tons of cargo, valued at over $20 billion, on the “marine highway” created by Columbia and Snake River dams is the most environmentally friendly way to move cargo. It keeps 700,000 trucks off the region’s highways every year.

  • The annual net earned income from Pacific Northwest agriculture exceeds $8 billion. The region’s economy is greatly enhanced by 7.8 million acres of irrigated agricultural land that without hydropower and reservoirs, would otherwise be too dry to farm successfully.

  • A federal reservoir storage plan helps avert flood danger in the Columbia River Basin;

  • The hydropower system and its public power customers fund an extensive fish and wildlife program in the Columbia River Basin. There are more fish in the Columbia River than at any time since the first dam was built on the lower river at Bonneville in 1938. In 2015, over 2.3 million adult salmon passed Bonneville Dam, the second-strongest return since counts began in 1938. Young salmon make the downstream trip through eight federal dams on an average rate of 97 percent survival at each facility.